U.S. v. GALLOWAY, NO. 12-4545

Decided: April 15, 2014

The Fourth Circuit held that the defendant failed to meet the high standard on appeal for his ineffective assistance of counsel claim.  The Court also found that the district court acted reasonably, in light of past securities breaches, when it prohibited the defendant from taking any discovery materials back to his detention center.  The Court concluded that the district court did not err when it denied the defendant’s motion to suppress the evidence from his wiretaps because each of the affidavits provided specific facts that demonstrated the necessity of the wiretaps.  Finally, the Court held that the district court acted within its scope of discretion, as granted by Federal Rule of Evidence (F.R.E.) 702, and did not plainly err in its admission of expert testimony, and its management of that testimony to avoid confusion.

The defendant, Charles Galloway, was convicted of conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute (P.W.I.D.) heroin from wiretaps and testimony of drug traffickers in the Baltimore area.  He was then sentenced to 292 months’ imprisonment.  While investigating an international drug trafficking conspiracy, Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) Special Agent (SA) Karas uncovered a link between the defendant, and Santos Chavez, a coconspirator in Los Angeles, California.  After this discovery, SA Karas notified Detective Sokolowski of the Baltimore City Police Department, who then began his investigation of the defendant.  As a result of Sokolowski’s investigation, wiretaps were placed on four of the defendant’s cellphones, which were used as evidence in his trial.  During the defendant’s trial, SA Karas and Detective Sokolowski both testified as fact and expert witnesses on drug distribution methods and interpreting the coded language used in drug-related telephone calls.

While an effective assistance of counsel claim is typically raised as a collateral challenge with the district court, the Fourth Circuit noted that a defendant may raise this challenge on appeal “if it conclusively appears from the record that” counsel failed to provide effective assistance.  United States v. Smith, 62 F.3d 641, 651 (4th Cir. 1995).  Upon review of the record, the Court reasoned that the defendant failed to meet this high standard, and that the defendant’s lack of trial preparation resulted from his decisions to fire his lawyer, withdraw a continuance motion, and represent himself.

The defendant also claimed that the district court abused its discretion by prohibiting him from taking any discovery materials to the detention center while he prepared his pro se defense.  The Fourth Circuit reasoned that any inconvenience the defendant suffered was reasonable because the district court had experienced past security issues with discovery at federal detention facilities, which resulted in the killing of witnesses.  The Court also noted that the district court attempted to mitigate the defendant’s inconveniences while he prepared his pro se defense, and that the defendant failed to seek a continuance as a result of the logistical challenges.

Next, the defendant claimed that the district court erred when it denied his motion to suppress the evidence from the wiretaps because two of the three affidavits failed to specify facts that demonstrated the necessity of the wiretaps.  The Fourth Circuit emphasized that bare conclusory statements do not meet the requirements of 18 U.S.C. § 2518(1)(c), but that specific factual information is enough for “‘wiretapping [to] become reasonable, despite ‘the statutory preference for less intrusive [investigation] techniques.’”  United States v. Smith, 31 F.3d 1294, 1297–98 (4th Cir. 1994).  The Court reasoned that the government met this burden by detailing around ten alternative investigatory procedures, along with the likelihood of success on each procedure, in each of the three affidavits.

Finally, the defendant claimed that the district court erred in its admission of expert testimony, and in its management of the testimony presented to avoid confusion.  The Fourth Circuit reviewed the district court’s admission of expert testimony and management of the witnesses’ dual capacity for plain error because the defendant failed to object during trial.  Plain error requires that the court review for “a miscarriage of justice that would seriously affect the fairness, integrity, or public reputation of the judicial proceedings.”  United States v. Baptiste, 596 F.3d 214, 220 (4th Cir. 2010).  Here, the Court found that the district court specifically instructed the prosecutor to “be careful that we separate . . . lay testimony as a lay witness from the proffer of any expert testimony” in front of the jury.  In addition, the Court reasoned that the jury, as fact finder, was able to accept or reject any of the testimony presented.  Therefore, the district court acted properly and followed established protocol.

Full Opinion

Samantha R. Wilder

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