Angelex Ltd. v. United States, No. 13-1610

Decided: July 22, 2013

 The Fourth Circuit held that the district court lacked subject matter jurisdiction to consider a petition brought by a detained ship and its owner for release because the United States Coast Guard’s decision to detain the ship was subject to agency discretion alone. Therefore, the decision to detain was not appealable to the district court.

 The United States Coast Guard (“Coast Guard”), acting through the Department of Homeland Security, detained the Antonis G. Pappadakis (“the ship”), a bulk cargo carrier owned by Angelex, Ltd. (“Angelex”) at port in Norfolk, Virginia under suspicion that the ship had likely been discharging pollution and failed to keep adequate records under federal and international law. After several days of negotiation, the Coast Guard agreed to release the ship upon the posting of a $2.5 million bond and complying with a number of non-monetary obligations to ensure the cooperation of crewmembers and officials in its ongoing investigation. Angelex refused to pay the required $2.5 million bond and filed a petition in the Eastern District of Virginia seeking release of the ship or imposition of an appropriate bond for release. The district court asserted jurisdiction based on the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”), or, in the alternative, admiralty jurisdiction. The district court granted the petition, finding that the bond was excessive and exceeded the Coast Guard’s authority, and set a new bond at $1.5 million. The United States of America, the Coast Guard, and the United States Customs and Border Protection Agency (collectively the “Government”) appealed the district court’s order on the grounds that the district court lacked subject matter jurisdiction to consider Angelex’s petition.

The Fourth Circuit held that the district court lacked subject matter jurisdiction to hear Angelex’s petition under both the APA and admiralty jurisdiction. The APA allows a court to set aside agency action that are found to be “arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with the law.” The APA provides to exceptions to judicial review of agency action: (1) where the “statute precludes judicial review,” or (2) “when agency action is committed to agency discretion.” In the present case, the Fourth Circuit found that the Coast Guard’s decision to detain the ship was a decision that fell within the latter exception, and was thus, not reviewable. Under the applicable law, the Coast Guard has the authority to determine the amount of the bond required to avoid detainment, or it may determine that it will not accept a bond at all. Thus, the Coast Guard has near complete discretion and the court may not question the reasonableness of the Coast Guard’s decision. In fact, the Fourth Circuit described the Coast Guard’s discretion to deny departure clearance as “limitless.”

The Fourth Circuit further held that the court could not hear the case under admiralty jurisdiction. The district court determined that the withholding of the ship was “tantamount to an arrest of the ship,” which is a dispute that falls within the court’s admiralty jurisdiction. The Fourth Circuit disagreed, finding that the denial of departure clearance was not sufficiently analogous to “arrest of the ship” to confer admiralty jurisdiction. The court also held that the denial of departure clearance was not sufficiently similar to an admiralty lien to confer jurisdiction. Therefore, the court found that the Coast Guard’s decision to detain the ship was squarely within its congressionally conferred discretion and was not subject to review in the district court.

Full Opinion

– Wesley B. Lambert

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